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Miuniku F/W 2013 photographed by Brendan Peer for Used Magazine

Miuniku F/W 2013 photographed by Brendan Peer for Used Magazine

lackist:

Jeffrey De Keyser 

lackist:

Jeffrey De Keyser 

buffchickpea:

women did not shave their armpits until 1920s and their legs until 1943 and both were the direct result of razor companies producing pictures of hairless women to sell razors.

please stop putting hairless women in historic movies just bc OH NO MEN MIGHT NOT GET A BONER WATCHING OUR MOVIE WE CANT HAVE THAT

blastedheath:

Jean Misceslas Peské (Russian, 1870-1949), Paysage du Midi. Oii on canvas, 79 x 97 cm.

blastedheath:

Jean Misceslas Peské (Russian, 1870-1949), Paysage du Midi. Oii on canvas, 79 x 97 cm.

nyctaeus:

Andy Worhol, ‘Brillo Box (Soap Pads)’, 1964
"Warhol’s boxes were life-like illusions and fundamentally different from Duchamp’s ready-mades for two important reasons. Firstly these trompe-l’oeil boxes were handmade wood constructions with silkscreen ink and house paint as opposed to the ‘originals’ whose labels were made with offset lithography on cardboard, and secondly, “…they were empty inside, filled with nothing but air, as hollow as the rhetoric so boldly emblazoned upon them.” 
Danto argues that Warhol’s Brillo Boxes of 1964 were literally three dimensional photographs of the products—an extension of what Andy had done with the Soup Cans— stacked in columns just as if they were for sale. Perceived and exhibited, the “Brillo Box” became, in Danto’s eyes, the first “post-historical work” that demands something other than eyes. Danto’s question was no longer “What is art?” but rather “Given two indiscernible objects, one a work of art and the other not, wherein are they different?” The reference is, of course, to his grocery boxes as against their counterparts in the real world. Warhol’s boxes are silkscreen photographs of the latter, in three dimensions, and for all intensive purposes perfect copies of the originals. Danto declares we have reached “the end of art”, at the time when the line between art objects and ordinary objects are invisible.” - Freize Magazine, Living in Worhol’s World by Arthur C Danto

nyctaeus:

Andy Worhol, ‘Brillo Box (Soap Pads)’, 1964

"Warhol’s boxes were life-like illusions and fundamentally different from Duchamp’s ready-mades for two important reasons. Firstly these trompe-l’oeil boxes were handmade wood constructions with silkscreen ink and house paint as opposed to the ‘originals’ whose labels were made with offset lithography on cardboard, and secondly, “…they were empty inside, filled with nothing but air, as hollow as the rhetoric so boldly emblazoned upon them.” 

Danto argues that Warhol’s Brillo Boxes of 1964 were literally three dimensional photographs of the products—an extension of what Andy had done with the Soup Cans— stacked in columns just as if they were for sale. Perceived and exhibited, the “Brillo Box” became, in Danto’s eyes, the first “post-historical work” that demands something other than eyes. Danto’s question was no longer “What is art?” but rather “Given two indiscernible objects, one a work of art and the other not, wherein are they different?” The reference is, of course, to his grocery boxes as against their counterparts in the real world. Warhol’s boxes are silkscreen photographs of the latter, in three dimensions, and for all intensive purposes perfect copies of the originals. Danto declares we have reached “the end of art”, at the time when the line between art objects and ordinary objects are invisible.” - Freize Magazine, Living in Worhol’s World by Arthur C Danto

taces:

Ali Michael

taces:

Ali Michael

softwaring:

Arial Abstracts, 2014;

Zack Seckler

dailyrothko:

Mark Rothko, no 5, 1954

dailyrothko:

Mark Rothko, no 5, 1954

retcum:

emanuelco:

anabella in glowing mia.

☺️☺️☺️

arpeggia:

David Shrigley

arpeggia:

David Shrigley

carlowski:

Roy Lichtenstein

chrissyangliker:

Swimming Upstream. 22x 28 Inches on canvas. 2014

chrissyangliker:

Swimming Upstream. 22x 28 Inches on canvas. 2014